nanoq: flat out and bluesome. Research archive at Centre for Art + Environment at Nevada Museum of Art, US

Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir and Mark Wilson investigate relationships between nature and culture, human and non-human animals, and domesticity and what is often referred to as “wild nature.” Working from both Reykjavik and London, they create installations that combine sculpture, text, photography, and video. Their most well-known exhibition, Nanoq: Flat Out and Bluesome (2001 – 2006), was a survey of all the taxidermied polar bears in the United Kingdom.
While researching the history of each bear, they identified the date, place and people associated with the animal’s death. They also created a photographic archive of each specimen and its taxidermic context—whether in storage, on display, or undergoing restoration.
Although Snæbjörnsdóttir and Wilson have worked with a number of other species, including birds and fishes, polar bears remain a subject of great interest to them. Since 2015 they have been artists-in-residence at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska in its Polar Labs program. Their work is on the denning habits and structures of the Alaskan bears, and how we must minimize disturbance of their dens by oil companies on the North Slope.

See: http://www.nevadaart.org/explore/collections/cae-archive-collections/finding-aids/

To access the data entries: http://publicsearch.nevadaart.org/rediscoveryproficiopublicsearch/ArchiveHome.aspx?NEVARCH and enter “CAE1310”

nanoq: flat out and bluesome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27/09/2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are about to go north again, tomorrow to Kaktovik in the Alaskan Arctic. Kaktovik is located at 70°7′58″N 143°36′58″W. Hosted by our colleague, artist Allison Akootchook Warden, we will spend 5 days in this village discussing the effects of climate change in relation to this coastal environment and its human and non-human denizens. Watch this space. This visit is in continued preparation for our solo show at Anchorage Museum in the Fall of 2020.

Westfjörds: Feral Attraction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In May 2018, Snæbjörnsdóttir Wilson re-installed their exhibition Feral Attraction: Museum of Ghost Ruminants at Hnjotur Museum, near Patreksfjördur overlooking the mountain peninsula, Tálkni, where the events drawn upon in the exhibition took place in late 2009 and early 2010. Although the Museum is closed now for winter it will re-open in Spring and the exhibition will remain until July 2019.